Artwork by Matsumi Kanemitsu,  San Francisco (1968)
Thumbnail of Artwork by Matsumi Kanemitsu,  San Francisco (1968) Thumbnail of Artwork by Matsumi Kanemitsu,  San Francisco (1968) Thumbnail of Artwork by Matsumi Kanemitsu,  San Francisco (1968)

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Cowley Abbott
326 Dundas St West
Toronto ON M5T 1G5
Ph. 1(416)479-9703

Matsumi Kanemitsu
San Francisco (1968)

colour lithograph
Inscribed “San Francisco 38, Happy 14, New York 4/29/69” upper left; signed, dated 1968 and numbered 7/80 lower right; displayed with a mat in shrinkwrap
30 x 22 ins ( 76.2 x 55.9 cms ) ( sheet )

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Provenance:
Private Collection, Ontario
Matsumi Kanemitsu was born in Ogden, Utah in 1922. Raised in Japan by his grandparents, he returned to the U.S. in 1940, and enlisted in the army the next year. Following the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor, Kanemitsu was arrested and placed in an internment camp. During his imprisonment, he began drawing with art supplies provided by the Red Cross. Once released, Kanemitsu served in Europe as a military hospital assistant, making his way to France following the war. There he trained under Fernand Leger and met several prominent artists including Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse. In 1949, Kanemitsu returned to the United States where he studied art in Baltimore. Kanemitsu then went to New York, studying at the Art Students League and immersing himself in the vibrant, post-war art scene of the 1950s. Becoming a frequent patron of the famous Cedar Bar, Kanemitsu befriended notable artists of the New York School, including Franz Kline, Ad Reinhardt, the poet Frank O’Hara and the critic Harold Rosenberg. His art work developed from ambiguous figurative works inflected with surrealism to gestural abstraction.

Kanemitsu settled in Los Angeles in the 1960s, creating distinctive works informed not only by Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art, but also with Japanese sumi painting. He applied this array of techniques to the medium of printmaking, producing a major suite of lithographs in 1961 with the support of a Ford Foundation grant. This project was explored in the short documentary film “Four Stones for Kanemitsu”. Influential as an artist and educator, his distinctive paintings and prints can be found in numerous public and private collections around the world. 
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Preview this item at:

Cowley Abbott
326 Dundas St West
Toronto ON M5T 1G5
Ph. 1(416)479-9703


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Matsumi Kanemitsu
(1922 - 1992)

Matsumi Kanemitsu was born in Ogden, Utah in 1922. Raised in Japan by his grandparents, he returned to the U.S. in 1940, and enlisted in the army the next year. Following the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbour, Kanemitsu was arrested and placed in an internment camp. During his imprisonment, he began drawing with art supplies provided by the Red Cross. Once released, Kanemitsu served in Europe as a military hospital assistant, making his way to France following the war. There he trained under Fernand Leger and met several prominent artists including Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse. In 1949, Kanemitsu returned to the United States where he studied art in Baltimore. Kanemitsu then went to New York, studying at the Art Students League and immersing himself in the vibrant, post-war art scene of the 1950s. Becoming a frequent patron of the famous Cedar Bar, Kanemitsu befriended notable artists of the New York School, including Franz Kline, Ad Reinhardt, the poet Frank O’Hara and the critic Harold Rosenberg. His art work developed from ambiguous figurative works inflected with surrealism to gestural abstraction.

Kanemitsu settled in Los Angeles in the 1960s, creating distinctive works informed not only by Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art, but also with Japanese sumi painting. He applied this array of techniques to the medium of printmaking, producing a major suite of lithographs in 1961 with the support of a Ford Foundation grant. This project was explored in the short documentary film “Four Stones for Kanemitsu”. Influential as an artist and educator, his distinctive paintings and prints can be found in numerous public and private collections around the world.