Artwork by Marian Mildred Dale Scott,  Staircase, circa 1940
Thumbnail of Artwork by Marian Mildred Dale Scott,  Staircase, circa 1940 Thumbnail of Artwork by Marian Mildred Dale Scott,  Staircase, circa 1940 Thumbnail of Artwork by Marian Mildred Dale Scott,  Staircase, circa 1940

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Cowley Abbott
326 Dundas St West
Toronto ON M5T 1G5
Ph. 1(416)479-9703

Lot #120

Marian Scott
Staircase, circa 1940

double-sided oil on canvas
signed on the reverse
24 x 18 in ( 61 x 45.7 cm )

Auction Estimate: $30,000.00$20,000.00 - $30,000.00

Provenance:
Masters Gallery, Calgary
Private Collection
Literature:
Sarah Milroy, "Uninvited: Canadian Women Artists in the Modern Moment", Kleinburg, Ontario, 2021, similar work reproduced page 250 ("Stairway", circa 1940, Montreal Museum of Fine Arts)
Montreal painter Marian Mildred Dale Scott acquired her first formal art training at the Art Association of Montreal between 1917 and 1920. She then became one of the first women to enroll in the École des beaux-arts de Montréal, before completing her training the following year at the Slade School of Art in London, England. Despite being a mother, wife of a prominent lawyer, poet, and member of Canada’s social democratic movement, Scott continued to pursue her art practice her entire life.

Over the course of her long career, Scott evolved her style from realism to abstraction as she worked to develop her own personal response to the rapidly evolving art world. While her mature work is dominated by abstraction, Scott began her career by painting very structured landscapes and botanical imagery, followed by a series of human faces with strong linear forms. During the Depression the artist depicted the people of Montreal: scenes of labourers, machinery, and urban life. "Staircase", dating to "circa" 1940, is characteristic of Scott’s style during this time. It portrays a quintessential outdoor spiral staircase of Montreal’s urban housing. The architecture, tree and four figures are painted in the artist’s structured approach, as are the quasi-abstract figures Scott depicted on the reverse of the canvas.

The year after "Staircase" was completed, in 1941, Scott was the subject of a solo show in Boston. Her style shifted again in 1943 when she was commissioned to paint an enormous mural for McGill University to commemorate their ground-breaking research on the endocrine system, executed in a style referencing ‘scientific symbolism’ or ‘biomorphism’. By the 1960s, Scott’s paintings became increasingly abstract, always maintaining a sense of order, symmetry and repetition.
Sale Date: May 30th 2024

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Cowley Abbott
326 Dundas St West
Toronto ON M5T 1G5
Ph. 1(416)479-9703


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Marian Mildred Dale Scott
(1906 - 1993) Canadian Group of Painters, RCA

Born Marian Mildred Dale in Montreal, Quebec in 1906, Dale Scott began her artistic training at age eleven at the Art Association of Montreal. She then attended the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Montreal for three years and continued her training at the Slade School in London, England.

Dale Scott explored a wide range of subjects including landscapes, urban scenes, the human form, botanicals, and geometric abstraction as her career progressed. Her approach was also varied, stressing structure and organization, and then impulsive and gestural.