Artwork by Lynn Russell Chadwick,  Maquette II Walking Woman
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Cowley Abbott
326 Dundas St West
Toronto ON M5T 1G5
Ph. 1(416)479-9703

Lynn Chadwick
Maquette II Walking Woman

bronze
stamped signature, edition (7/9) and inscriptions of “C6S” & “Ⓑ” on the underside
11.75 x 6 x 8 ins ( 29.8 x 15.2 x 20.3 cms ) ( overall )

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Provenance:
Acquired directly from the artist
Jason Rhodes Gallery, London
A Private Canadian Collection
Literature:
Terence Mullaly, “Lynn Chadwick”, Obituary, The Guardian, April 28, 2003
In 1971, Lynn Chadwick opened his own foundry at Lypiatt, Cheltenham, UK, where he cast many small and mid-size bronzes. Throughout the rest of the decade the sculptor began to clothe his figures in drapery, appearing winged with billowing cloaks. This theme continued and intensified into the 1980s, where many bronze works exaggerated the effects of wind. Maquette II Walking Woman, 1984, highlights this effect that Chadwick had recently mastered. It is an impressive technique how the artist managed to illustrate the effect of billowing fabric while using such a rigid and opaque medium, and despite maintaining a quasi-geometric manner.

Maquette II Walking Woman is a maquette for a larger version of the bronze sculpture, standing at over seven feet tall. Walking Woman was displayed at Chadwick’s notable 24-work Marlborough Fine Art exhibition during autumn 1984, a show in honour of the sculptor’s 70th birthday. It is both vertical and horizontal in orientation in that the upright figure is trailed with billowing robes that fan out like a peacock’s feathers in the wind. The radial lines that structure these curvilinear sections are a reminder of the forged construction methods filled with stolit used by Chadwick since an early stage of his career. Walking Woman is a series of nine bronzes, one of which resides outside of the Salisbury Cathedral in the United Kingdom.

Chadwick’s approach to sculpture was constructive and additive, rather than subtractive modelling. He first made a linear armature or skeleton onto which he applied a skin, building up the surface to a solid form. Earlier works featured a textured finish, but his later pieces such as the Walking Woman series, have a smoother, more refined surface.

The Walking Woman series are some of Chadwick’s most recognizable artworks. In the artist’s obituary, Terence Mullaly writes: “His simplified human figures have already stamped themselves upon the artistic imagination and have come to stand as symbols.” The author goes on to explain why these figural works are so important: “This is a clue as to why his simplifications work so well both in his monumental pieces and in small bronzes. The female head is reduced to a triangle, the legs are straight and spiky, drapery is shown as an austere sweeping form, but the essentials of structure or movement are conveyed. Whether larger-than-life size or reduced down to the scale of a medal, the essentials of the image are clear.”
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Cowley Abbott
326 Dundas St West
Toronto ON M5T 1G5
Ph. 1(416)479-9703


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Lynn Russell Chadwick
(1914 - 2003)

Lynn Russell Chadwick was a 20th century British artist, highly renowned for his skeletal iron and bronze sculpture, often of abstracted animal and humanlike forms. He originally trained as an architectural draftsman, which was the only formal education Chadwick ever received as an artist. He recalled: "What it taught me was how to compose things, a formal exercise in composition, really, it has nothing to do with the building it represents".

In April 1941, Chadwick volunteered to serve in the Fleet Air Arm, and in 1941–1944 he served as a pilot during the Second World War escorting Atlantic convoys. After the war, Chadwick returned to England, working for Rodney Thomas, who helped him find his beginnings as a sculptor. He became involved in the design of exhibition stands and textile design, and in 1947, with the encouragement of Thomas, constructed his first mobile.

After studying welding in the early 1950s, however, Chadwick turned to stable metal constructions. He became known for his improvisational technique of welding metal without sketches or plans, designing as he manipulated his material. He represented Great Britain at the 1952 Venice Biennale. He won the International Sculpture Prize at the 1956 Biennale, which brought him worldwide acclaim. By the late 1950s Chadwick began to cast works in bronze. He experimented with many styles and subjects throughout the 1970s and 70s, from abstract sculpture to figural works, followed by monumental stainless steel sculptures known as ‘Beasts’. Following a highly successful career, the artist was appointed a Senior Royal Academician of the Royal Academy of Arts, London, in 2001. Chadwick died at Lypiatt Park in 2003, the same year in which he was given a major retrospective exhibition at Tate Britain.

Literature Source: Levine, P, Chadwick: The Artist and his Work. Spruyt, Van Mantgem & De Does BV/Leiden, The Netherlands, 1988 page 55